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Mar 27 2015

I have been told countless times how magnificent the view is from the top of Monkey Mountain, which provides a 360-degree view of the Bahia de Banderas area. Given that yesterday morning was perfect for hiking in Sayulita, I was excited to put my shoes to good use and venture up the mountain, which is only a five minute drive from the Sayulita plaza.

On the way, Steve Pomeroy, owner of MexiTreks, explained the various theories as to why Monkey Mountain is indeed called Monkey Mountain to me, Lisette Surette from Halifax, Novia Scotia, the Fairbanks family from the Chicagoland area, and Angela Wieland, a Sayulita local. As he pointed out the mountain in the distance, the anticipation of our adventure built.

Steve offered walking sticks to each of us, but we were a tough group, all declining the extra assistance. However, the bug spray he offered was another story.

As we set off for our hike, Steve explained that the hiking forest is considered a subtropical dry forest, and that many of the plants drop their leaves to conserve water and drop their seeds. He told us about the indigenous people, pointed out a petroglyph, and patiently answered all of our questions. Throughout the hike, Steve continued to point out things of interest, such as starfruit trees, bee hives, petrified wood, old volcanic rock, capamo seeds, and so much more.

The forest was alive with the chirps of various birds, like the rofous-bellied chachalaca and the orange-fronted parakeet, and the sound of brahman cows. As the sun shone through the trees, we made our way along a trail, surrounded by the beauty of nature. At times the trail was rocky and at certain points, quite steep. However, Steve pointed out ropes for us to hold on to as we climbed. He also stressed safety during the entire hike, encouraging us to take breaks whenever needed, warning us to watch our step, and even going ahead and checking for snakes.

It took us about an hour and a half to reach the top, and when we did, we were slightly out of breath and sweaty, but thrilled with the view. The Pacific Ocean stretched as far as the eye could see and we could see Sayulita and Punta de Mita in the distance. I climbed a few large rocks, stood at the highest point of Monkey Mountain, and felt like I was on top of the world.

If you would like to experience this hike for yourself or one of the other hikes offered by Steve, contact him at MexiTreks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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